Read Practicing Christian Doctrine: An Introduction to Thinking and Living Theologically by Beth Felker Jones Online

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This introductory theology text explains key concepts in Christian doctrine and shows that doctrine is integrally linked to the practical realities of Christian life. In order to grow into more faithful practitioners of Christianity, we need to engage in the practice of learning doctrine and understanding how it shapes faithful lives. Beth Felker Jones helps students articThis introductory theology text explains key concepts in Christian doctrine and shows that doctrine is integrally linked to the practical realities of Christian life. In order to grow into more faithful practitioners of Christianity, we need to engage in the practice of learning doctrine and understanding how it shapes faithful lives. Beth Felker Jones helps students articulate basic Christian doctrines, think theologically so they can act Christianly in a diverse world, and connect Christian thought to their everyday life of faith.This book, written from a solidly evangelical yet ecumenically aware perspective, models a way of doing theology that is generous and charitable. It attends to history and contemporary debates and features voices from the global church. Sidebars made up of illustrative quotations, key Scripture passages, classic hymn texts, and devotional poetry punctuate the chapters....

Title : Practicing Christian Doctrine: An Introduction to Thinking and Living Theologically
Author :
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ISBN : 9780801049330
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 246 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Practicing Christian Doctrine: An Introduction to Thinking and Living Theologically Reviews

  • Garrett Cash
    2018-11-27 11:03

    This is the first book I’ve ever won from Goodreads First Reads, and in the past week or so I’ve won three other books. I’m one lucky dog! I wasn’t sure how much I was going to enjoy this book (I couldn't imagine some book I won could be that good) but when I read the first few chapters I was quite surprised by how informative, enjoyable, and lucid this book is. I found Jones’s work to be a pleasing introduction to the world of theology. As someone who has been a student of apologetics, my knowledge of theology was good but not well-rounded. This book cleared up a lot of questions I had about different viewpoints and definitions of several theological terms. Jones successfully makes sure that the reader doesn't get too bogged down in studying God by including the occasional poem or hymn of praise that reminds one of His greatness. She presents many of the arguments for a wide variety of theological issues that are important to understand. Although this is a well-done portion of the book, it is not without its flaws. While some would see the absence of a obvious author opinion as a quality, it makes it difficult to see the author as a person when she does not make any comments based from opinion. I am aware that this book is meant to be a more scholarly work, but for the average reader, the feeling of a connection or understanding with the author is essential. Jones covers many heretical teachings of the church throughout the centuries that, while informative and enlightening in a way that helps us avoid these theological missteps, creates a problem where the reader might get bored and drug down through seemingly needless detail on controversies that have been long solved. I don’t think the exploration of these heresies was unnecessary or bad so to say, but I will admit that the detail put into them became tiring after a period of time. The author includes theological perspectives from world theologians in places like Africa or South America. Why the author is interested in presenting these views or what it has do with her and/or the material goes unexplained. I would say its most likely due to her fascination with the ecumenical church, but this interest alone cannot explain why these views would be explored when the purpose of the book is supposed to be learning to think and live theologically. Not to study worldviews on God. It’s somewhat difficult to tell who the audience for this book is supposed to be. Even as a longtime laymen student of apologetics and some theology I learned plenty of new things, but there was a lot of material that I couldn’t imagine someone reading this kind of book wouldn’t already know. It is an introduction, so I understand trying to flesh out some of the basics, but the book sometimes dives into basics that anyone who has attended church for a half year would understand. A minor complaint of mine would be Jones’s reliance on the quotes of John Wesley, whom she uses incessantly. I would assume from this that she is a follower of Wesleyanism, but even so I would have liked more of a variety of sources quoted. She sticks to her favorites and doesn’t branch too far out from there. The biggest problem is the theme of the book, “practicing Christian doctrine.” While the title of the book makes the premise sound like the book will be approaching theology from a fresh angle by trying to show how theology can affect you and make you live life differently, this aspect is relegated to barely a cameo appearance. Jones spends most of each chapter summarizing each topic as it is viewed in theology, and at the end of the chapter she uses about a page to try to explain how this affects the way you’ll live life. While I enjoyed the book and gained a lot from it, this premise of “living and thinking theologically” appears to be merely a tacked-on gimmick to sell what is otherwise an introductory theology text to a wider audience. If Jones had only spent more time on each section detailing this topic, it might not be a problem. As it is, it appears that Jones is desperately attempting to figure out a tie-in to the theme for each chapter even when there isn't one. And lastly, the book ends without much of a sense of closure due to the neglect of the main premise. The last chapter is a good one that deals with eschatology (teaching of the last things like heaven, hell, the second coming, etc.) but after that is a benediction and the book ends. Jones should have ended it by including a final chapter that summarizes the book’s main points and argues for the practice of its subject. She attempts to do so in the benediction, but it is not quite as effective as a last chapter could have been. If this book were to enter a second printing, I would keep the benediction but add the needed chapter. Overall, despite my criticisms, I'm partial towards the book and I was happy to read it. I learned a lot, and I would recommend it to those who are looking for an introductory theology work that is understandable to the layman. It’s not perfect, but it does an intelligent job. 3.5

  • Kristen
    2018-11-26 10:52

    This is a simultaneously deep and practical guide to "doing" theology -- loving God and living a life that reflects Christian beliefs. I would commend it highly to anyone, but it would be perfect for a high school or college theology class. It walks through a basic systematic theology that is evangelical, global, and very informed about the history of the Christian traditions. Readers are exposed to great thinkers in the church (past and present) as well as areas where different Christian traditions differ, and cautioned by beliefs that resulted in heresy. This book is a gift to the church, and I hope it finds as wide an audience as it deserves.

  • Don Dunnington
    2018-11-30 05:59

    Very helpful, accessible introduction to basic Christian theology. I am using it as a text in a course titled "Foundations of Christian Belief."

  • Chanda
    2018-11-27 05:05

    Don't just talk to the talk, walk the walk. The author does a fantastic job of communicating just why it is important to walk - to LIVE - the doctrine that we so faithfully believe in as Christians. Although there are many complex issues to consider regarding doctrine - knowledge, worship, the Trinity, and diversity - Jones uses her experience teaching to make them understandable.

  • Erianne Thedorf
    2018-12-03 10:41

    Great book to learn some basic theology concepts of Christianity. Read this for a class in college, was hard to follow unless you have someone explaining/discussing it with you along the way.

  • Kalen
    2018-11-29 10:46

    I read this book for my Christian Theology class. Beth Felker Jones is very accessible and thorough. Great for newbies to theology!