Read my dear jenny by Madeleine E. Robins Online

my-dear-jenny

Stranded with an inn-full of travelers, Jenny Prydd finds herself embroiled in Emily Pellering’s reluctant elopement. When she realizes that Emily’s having second thoughts Jenny finds it impossible not to interfere. With the help of her fellow travelers — enigmatic Peter Teverley and his nephew Dominic — Jenny foils a fortune-hunter’s plans.That should be the end of it, buStranded with an inn-full of travelers, Jenny Prydd finds herself embroiled in Emily Pellering’s reluctant elopement. When she realizes that Emily’s having second thoughts Jenny finds it impossible not to interfere. With the help of her fellow travelers — enigmatic Peter Teverley and his nephew Dominic — Jenny foils a fortune-hunter’s plans.That should be the end of it, but when they reach London matters grow more complex: the fortune-hunting Adrian Ratherscombe still has his eye on Emily. Dominic Teverley has a tendre for Emily, but she only has eyes for Peter. Jenny's growing feelings for the intriguing, infuriating Peter Teverley are simply not to be borne. But she finds it isn’t easy to put such dreams aside......

Title : my dear jenny
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 7854169
Format Type : ebook
Number of Pages : 224 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

my dear jenny Reviews

  • Milela
    2018-11-21 00:22

    I am amazed that Madeleine Robins' name is not as widely known as it should rightfully be among fans of 'Traditional Romance' books. By 'traditional' I mean books that make the reader plunge, and blissfully soak, in the time, place and mores, and whose characters and behaviours are equally consistent. Sex is not an issue per se (disclaimer: I'm no militant Christian, just someone with a solid idea of what fits with historical settings, and who still marvels at the twists and turns in the publishing trade) yet CONSISTENCY is! In my decade-long search for history-based, HEA books (IMO there should be a literary subgenre, separate from what currently goes under the misleading 'romance' label) I've had my full of well bred, respectable young women supposedly living before the birth-control era, yet thinking and behaving as if sexual awareness were a given, as well as of alpha(?) male leads who'd better fit a body-building contest than London drawing rooms in the 19th century. Not to mention the too many gagging and WTF moments through drivel that reviews depicted as the next Austen+Heyer descendant. I cannot believe it took me two years of browsing before stumbling upon this REAL jewel.The book is not perfect, of course. It was written when the author was still very young, and the plot is very close to a couple of Georgette Heyer's, but the style and dialogues are pitch perfect, and there is even a touch more of Austen's social critics (all right, let's say "dry depiction of defects" not to ruffle feathers) than Heyer, or her followers like Clare Darcy, ever approached.The fifth star is to try and even out the unsupported-by-review ratings from readers, whom i can only figure as suffering from, as they'd word it, 'lack of steam.' I wish this helps adding visibility to a very worthy and enjoyable book and to its author. I'm definitely going to read more from Ms Robins.

  • CathyKeaton
    2018-11-23 18:34

    I didn't expect to like this book so much, but I just couldn't help it. It's fabulous! Jenny, originally named Iphegenia, is a 27-year-old poor spinster of the gentry class who was never bred for marriage. She is content to exist to make other people, those higher in station, comfortable because she feels it enriches her own life, even if she's treated poorly and ill-used by those higher borne people. In the plot, she gets caught up in a scheme to protect a silly 17-year-old girl from marrying a young man only interested in her money, then becomes the girls unpaid companion for a few months in her home in London. Along the way, she meets Mr. Peter Teverley, a 35-year-old bachelor with some money and they spend their time having clever little spats with each other along the way. I really like Jenny because she's mature and proactive, although she is overly self-sacrificing. But, I can hardly fault her too much, since everybody expects her to be this way. Nobody can give her much respect for being a poor spinster (stupid society). Peter Teverley is seriously hilarious and incredibly blunt. I'd love to converse with someone like him because he's just so refreshingly honest, not to mention a handsome, smart bloke. This is a book written exactly like how Jane Austen wrote her romances, so much so, you'd think it's a 200-year-old novel. Of course, it was originally published in 1980, and I'm happy it got republished last year (2011). If you love Jane Austen, or sweet Regency romances, then how could you not adore this title? It's not overly predictable and all the characters are highly entertaining. I can't find much to dislike about this book. It's a joy to read.My score: 4.5 out of 5 stars.*I received a complementary copy from the publisher in exchange for my honest review.

  • Estara
    2018-11-14 18:33

    This book was released in 1980 and in those 3 years Robins really developed a deft hand with the Heyer-type regency. Jenny may be a poor relation/companion but she has learned to make the best out of it in her 27 years and enjoys whatever is on offer. Lady Threve is a marvellous poisonous antagonist and young Domenic a nice young man of a certain inner strength, but totally ruled by his mother. I enjoyed his Indian merchant uncle Peter, who after dismissing Jenny initially becomes more and more impressed by her common sense and sense of humour. You can actually see why he falls for her. I especially liked the scene where he lost his cool, not because Jenny had done anything stupid - she never does - but on behalf of her being too patient with the one big fly in the ointment - young, will-ful, egocentric Emily.However, compared to the Heyer's Tiffany Wield in The Nonesuch, who seems utterly over the top, here the egotism seems very natural - and Robins manages to make the reader see how the various nasty traits of people lead them to excuse their own bad behaviour and feel like the injured party.This book has 100 pages less than Althea, and while I would have liked an epilogue - really it's just the right length.

  • Jade
    2018-11-13 20:10

    This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.Loved it! I loved ‘Jenny’…the heroine of this lovely story! She’s a very no-nonsense kind of woman that is really quite hard on herself and a bit too nice at times... though she has been raised to be so. The descriptions of the different places, peoples clothes, carriages, etc was wonderful. I love how the ‘rip you to shreds while smiling ever so sweetly with no one ever the wiser’ comments flow so easily! The patience it takes to deal with that everywhere you go…well, I don’t have it! It’s great the way Jenny handles herself… defends herself quite well, but without the drama that could very easily come with it! The hero is wonderful!! Strong, straightforward, opinionated, irritating, protective and SO in love… very sexy in a man crazy as it seems! Sometimes it seemed like a word or a phrase was put in just because it would have fit in that era and it could sound a bit much. But other times it fit! All in all I highly recommend this book! It’s a fun, romantic, easy book you don’t want to put down!!

  • Linda
    2018-11-16 23:33

    I had issues with the hero referring to the heroine by her last name, 'Prydd'. Up until the last sentence in the book. And the romance was just too slow.

  • Katharine Kimbriel
    2018-11-22 21:14

    Recommended for lovers of Sweet Regency Romances!This novel of Regency England is a reprint of a book circa 1980, and would be called a Sweet Regency Romance in 2011. For once, I’m going to give you the back blurb, because it really pares nicely down to the real start of the book.“Stranded with an inn-full of travelers, Jenny Prydd finds herself embroiled in Emily Pellering’s reluctant elopement. When she realizes that Emily’s having second thoughts Jenny finds it impossible not to interfere. With the help of her fellow travelers — enigmatic Peter Teverley and his nephew Dominic — Jenny foils a fortune-hunter’s plans. That should be the end of it, but when they reach London matters grow more complex: the fortune-hunting Adrian Ratherscombe still has his eye on Emily. Dominic Teverley has a tendre for Emily, but she only has eyes for Peter. Jenny's growing feelings for the intriguing, infuriating Peter Teverley are simply not to be borne. But she finds it isn’t easy to put such dreams aside...”Here we have a heroine who has made the best of what life has handed her. She’s an interesting, gracious young woman, but on her best day she’s merely handsome, and in a family with two extremely attractive siblings, her mother decided early on that Jenny was not going to be worth bothering with.Left with tight finances after her parents’ death, and apparently no strong sibling ties, she ends up helping her loving if not-too-bright aunt with a growing family – until an old school friend invites her to the wedding of her sister (characters from Robins' first Regency novel ALTHEA.) And it’s on her way to London that all Jenny’s adventures begin.I enjoyed this Georgette Heyer Lite tale, although I got more of Emily, who proves a tad selfish at the throw, than I cared for. But Jenny shines all the more by the contrast, and you will be rewarded with a fine HEA.

  • Deirdre
    2018-11-15 22:17

    Ipigenia is a spinster who has resigned herself to a life of being a companion or assisting in a relatives house. When she gets a chance for a break in London when a friend invites her to a wedding and a visit with her. She takes the opportunity but when she takes a break in an inn she ends up quarantined in place. The only other woman there is Emily who is eloping with an older man and having second thoughts. The group of people there find themselves making and breaking friendships. One of the people there is Peter Teverley, and he and Ipigenia (whom he nicknames Jenny) start to spark but their path to true love is not smooth.I enjoyed this read. The characters were fun and I liked them.

  • Troxelm
    2018-12-01 23:24

    "My Dear Jenny" is a charming companion to "Althea." Robins writes in the style of Georgette Heyer, with strong females in the male-dominated Regency England society. The characters have strong feelings, and excellent manners. You won't find explicit love scenes, but if you enjoy wit, vocabulary and happy endings, you'll like this book.

  • Maureen E
    2018-11-24 19:18

    [e-book won through Library Thing] I suspected that this would be a Georgette Heyer knock-off. It wasn’t that exactly–I imagine that it does owe something to her, but it didn’t read like a thinner version of any of her books. On the other hand, the language and writing is nowhere near as strong. [Aug. 2011]

  • Ellen
    2018-11-21 23:37

    This was a sweet little book I acquired through Library Thing Early Reviewers. Can't say that I would have otherwise selected it. It was made of the sweet and typical stuff you'd expect, and made for lovely "curled up on a snowy day" reading.

  • Vonney Young
    2018-12-08 00:33

    Period romance, probably middle to late 1800s London, England

  • Frances
    2018-11-15 19:23

    A truly delightful real regency. I would give it a 7.5 out of ten. The old ones are still the best ones.

  • Monique
    2018-11-10 21:22

    Really great!